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BLOG / 09.20.18 /Jack Malley

New York Employers Required To Provide Sexual Harassment Training By January 1, 2019

As we previously reported, the New York State Sexual Harassment Law passed in April 2018 required all employers to:

Adopt the policy prohibiting sexual harassment in the form promulgated by the New York State Department of Labor (the “NYSDOL”) in consultation with the New York State Division of Human Rights, or adopt another policy that equals or exceeds the standards set by NYSDOL; and
Provide annual sexual harassment training for all their employees.

BLOG / 08.10.18 /Jack Malley

Columbia U. Professor Awarded $1.25 Million For Retaliation After Her Report Of Sexual Harassment

On July 27, 2018, former Columbia University finance professor, Enrichetta Ravina, was awarded $750,000 by a SDNY jury to be paid by the University and Geert Bekaert, the professor who allegedly harassed her, and $500,000 in punitive damages to be paid by Bekaert only.

BLOG / 08.06.18 /Jacob E. Amir

Defining “Substantial Completion” for Lien Law and Contract Purposes

Jacob Amir contributed an article in Cornerstone, the semi-annual publication of the Associated General Contractors, New York State, a leading trade association representing contractors and related companies in the building and highway construction industry. Jacob’s article addresses the importance of defining “substantial completion” for purposes of Lien Law and general contract claims brought on behalf of contractors.

BLOG / 07.20.18 /Jack Malley

Third Circuit Decision Sustaining Sexual Harassment Claim Influenced By Impact Of #MeToo Movement

On July 3, 2018, the Third Circuit issued a decision indicating that the #MeToo Movement has caused judges to be more cognizant of the fear of retaliation that victims of sexual harassment frequently feel.

BLOG / 07.18.18 /Jacob E. Amir

Expiration of tenant’s license issued under the New York Conservation Law permits owner to remove tenant for engaging in “illegal activity” under the Real Property Law

Lease agreements typically contain a provision whereby the agreement is deemed breached and the tenant may be evicted for engaging in “illegal activities.” Eviction based upon an illegal activity is also codified in New York Real Property Law § 231(1), which sets forth that a lease agreement becomes void where an occupant or lessee uses a premises for any “illegal trade, manufacture or other business”, thereupon permitting the owner to seek an eviction.

BLOG / 07.02.18 /Jack Malley

Wal-Mart Prevails Against Sympathetic Reasonable Accommodation Plaintiff

Sophisticated employers are well-schooled in their obligations to engage in an interactive process to determine if a reasonable accommodation can be provided to an employee with a disability. And some employers will err on the side of providing an accommodation even if the employee cannot perform an essential function of the job.

BLOG / 06.08.18 /Jack Malley

Supreme Court Opens Door For Employers To Require Employee Class Action Waivers

In a long awaited and hotly contested case, the United States Supreme Court has upheld an employer’s right to require employees to waive their right to commence or join class and collective action lawsuits against their employer. This decision, in Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, provides a powerful mechanism for an employer to reduce the risk of costly and time-consuming multi-plaintiff litigation.

BLOG / 05.30.18 /Jack Malley

Employment Law Update

All employers should be concerned about the recently passed New York State Sexual Harassment Law. The law requires all employers to comply with the following new requirements by October 9, 2018…

BLOG / 05.16.18 /Jacob E. Amir

Tenant deemed successful party in landlord’s “action to recover possession” seeking to reform lease to exclude tenant’s use of backyard of demised premises

Standard lease agreements include a provision that the successful party is entitled to recover attorneys’ fees and costs incurred on any action or proceeding brought for non-payment of rent or recovery of possession of the subject premises. Where the contract limits the attorneys’ fees provision for the benefit of the landlord (e.g., that landlord is entitled to recover), the law gives the tenant a reciprocal right to recovery of attorneys’ fees and costs if the tenant is successful in the action.

BLOG / 04.19.18 /Jacob E. Amir

Court Rules that Non-Participating Brokers Do Not Owe a Fiduciary Duty to a Brokerage Firm’s Client

It is well-established that real estate brokers owe a fiduciary duty of loyalty and to act in the best interest of their clients. Where the brokerage firm is comprised of several brokers, the client may naturally assume that both the listing broker, and the firm at large, will work in the best interest of the client’s needs and desires. A recent decision from the Westchester County Supreme Court warns clients against making this assumption.

BLOG / 04.09.18 /Jack Malley

Jury Awards Age Discrimination Claimant $200,000 For Retaliation

The verdict last month in Konsavage v. Mondalez Global, LLC, Case No. 3:15-cv-01155 (M.D. Pa.) provides another example of the difficulty in predicting the outcome of a retaliation claim – even where the underlying discrimination claims appear to be weak.

BLOG / 04.01.18 /Kenneth R. Jacobs

Fine Alert!

Everybody’s talking about the new smoking regulation, Local Law 147. Ken Jacobs tackles the subject in Habitat Magazine’s April Toolkit.

BLOG / 03.13.18 /Jack Malley

Jury Hits Hospital With $3.8 Million Verdict For Failing To Protect Employee From Harassment

On March 2, 2018 a Hawaii jury awarded a nurse $3.8 million on her claim that her employer, a hospital, ignored her reports of racial discrimination and harassment. The incidents occurred after the nurse reported a coworker for failing to safely care for patients in the intensive care unit. The nurse received a retaliatory note that contained racially charged language, including the “N” word. After the two people suspected of planting the note were interviewed by the hospital, a picture of a noose was taped to the nurse’s locker.

BLOG / 02.16.18 /Jacob E. Amir

Attorney’s fees, an offer for liquidated damages and the “prevailing party” under a commercial lease dispute

Lease agreements may contain an attorneys’ fee provision whereby the “prevailing party” is entitled to recover attorney’s fees. When owner and tenant settle their disputes before trial, that provision is waived or factored into the terms of settlement. Additionally, the civil rules allow a defendant to offer a liquidated amount as damages in the event plaintiff prevails on liability (i.e., all plaintiff has to do is prove liability). If plaintiff rejects the offer and recovers an amount less than what defendant offered, the defendant is entitled to recover attorney’s fees for the damages portion of trial.

BLOG / 02.15.18 /Jack Malley

Spotlight on Hon. Robert A. Spolzino

The Westchester County Bar Association features Hon. Robert A. Spolzino in it’s February Member Spotlight.

BLOG / 02.01.18 /Jack Malley

Who Pays For Repairs?

A small Manhattan co-op was struggling with a question: “Who’s responsible for replacing an air-conditioner sleeve? The sleeve was in place when the unit was sold by the sponsor to the current owner. The owner is happy to split the replacement cost with the board, but the board wants the owner to pay the entire amount.”

BLOG / 02.01.18 /Jack Malley

The Money Vanishes

And Queens co-ops and condos are suing one another to get it back.

BLOG / 12.27.17 /Jack Malley

NLRB Announces New Standard Governing Workplace Rules

On December 14, 2017, the NLRB reversed the portion of an Administrative Law Judge’s 2014 decision that barred The Boeing Company’s rule prohibiting the use of cell phones to capture images or take video on company grounds. [1] In doing so, the NLRB overruled the standard set forth in the 2004 Lutheran Heritage decision [2], namely that a workplace rule is unlawful even if it does not explicitly restrict activity protected by Section 7 of the NLRA ( i.e. , employees’ right to self-organize), if “employees would reasonably construe the language to prohibit Section 7 activity.”

BLOG / 12.06.17 /Jack Malley

Spotlight on Jacob Amir

The Westchester County Bar Association features Jacob Amir in it’s November Member Spotlight.

BLOG / 11.21.17 /Jack Malley

Board Recoups Legal Costs After Evicting Smoker

Some co-op and condo boards are penny wise pound foolish. And then there’s the board at an 80-unit co-op in Wheatley Heights, Long Island, which decided to spare no expense when it set out to evict a shareholder who repeatedly flouted the co-op’s smoking ban. It was a gamble that came with no guarantees and could have cost the co-op a bundle in legal fees.

BLOG / 11.17.17 /Jack Malley

Effective Anti-Harassment Policies Must Start At The Top Of The Organization

The continuing public exposure of sexual harassment by powerful executives and celebrities has shed light on the need for effective policies to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.

BLOG / 11.08.17 /Jack Malley

House of Representatives Passes Bill Narrowing Joint-Employer Definition

On November 7, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill narrowing the definition of “joint employer” issued in 2015 by the National Labor Relations Board in the well-publicized Brown-Ferris Industries matter.

BLOG / 10.31.17 /Jack Malley

Employers Beware: New York City’s New Salary History Law Is Effective As Of October 31

On October 31, 2017 New York City’s new salary history law goes into effect. The law, which applies to private employers of any size, bars employers from inquiring about a job applicant’s salary history, but permits employers to request an applicant’s compensation demands. The law also bars employers from seeking salary history information from an applicant’s current or former employers. New York City employers should review all job application forms to exclude questions about salary history, and train all interviewers to assure compliance with the law.

BLOG / 10.10.17 /Jack Malley

The Cooperator Expo 2017

Please join us at this year’s Co-op Expo on November 2, 2017. Partners Ken Jacobs & Domenick Tammaro are teaming up for a seminar at 2:30 to speak on the do’s and dont’s of dealing with problem residents.

BLOG / 10.10.17 /Jack Malley

Hon. Sylvia G. Ash Enforces Purchase Contract Executed by Attorney Only

In Yerushalmi Holdings, LLC v. Olumo Real Estate Corp., 2017 Slip Op. 30855(U) (Kings Cty. Sup. Ct.), Kings County Supreme Court recently enforced a contract signed by a party’s attorney that contained un-initialed handwritten changes.

BLOG / 09.14.17 /Jack Malley

Should I Get an Employment Attorney?

When it comes to your job, do you need the services of an employment attorney? There is a fine line when it comes to hiring legal guidance, but if you are still not sure after reading this article then it cannot hurt to consult an attorney. They will ultimately be able to give you the best information pertaining to your legal matters. While not every lawyer is created equal and not every lawyer you see is going to be on the same level, it is important to find a lawyer you can rely on and work with them when discussing employment issues. Read on to find out whether you should get an employment lawyer or at the very least go in for a consultation.

BLOG / 08.22.17 /Jack Malley

Consulting a Commercial Real Estate Attorney About Real Estate

The world of real estate can be complicated and even be intimidating for people who are new to it. Breaking down what’s going on in the field often involves figuring out where you stand in it. Zoning in on what type of real estate you would like to buy or sell will help you figure out where you’re going. Whether you’re going into residential real estate or commercial, real estate involves legal intricacies and details. When it comes to this, real estate lawyers might be very helpful.

BLOG / 07.12.17 /Jack Malley

Do You Need a Business Lawyer?

Do you need an experienced business lawyer on your side?

For many people, it can be tough to know when you need to call an attorney. However, just like with a medical issue, if you think that you might need a business attorney then you probably do. It’s better to consult with a lawyer and know for sure than to potentially face negative consequences because you needed one and didn’t get it.

BLOG / 06.16.17 /Jack Malley

Second Department Rejects Yellowstone Application where Tenant’s Default was not Curable

Real estate veterans are well familiar with the court order known as a Yellowstone injunction, which is sought by a commercial tenant to stop a landlord’s termination of its lease. In order to obtain the injunction, a tenant must demonstrate that: (1) it holds a lease, (2) its landlord served a notice to cure, (3) the tenant sought the Yellowstone injunction prior to the expiration of the cure period, and (4) the tenant has the ability and desire to cure the alleged default.

BLOG / 06.01.17 /Jack Malley

Appellate Division Rejects Finder’s Fee Claim

The recent decision issued by the First Department in Multi-Capital Group LLC v. Karasick, et al, 149 A.D.3d 437 (1st Dep’t April 6, 2017) provides a good set of facts to comprehend when a finder’s fee claim is viable. That case concerned the sale of the U.S. Steel Tower Building in Pittsburgh. The plaintiff submitted the winning bid to purchase the building via a letter of intent that included a $348 million purchase price. However, the plaintiff’s principal never actually intended to purchase the building. Rather, he intended to procure investors who would do so.

BLOG / 06.01.17 /Jack Malley

First Department Blesses Customary Rent Prove-Up Practice Utilized by Commercial Landlords

The recent decision in Moon 170 Mercer, Inc. v. Vella, 146 A.D.3d 537, 45 N.Y.S.2d 415 (1st Dep’t 2017) blesses the practice commercial landlords customarily utilize to prove-up the rent for which a tenant or guarantor is liable. In this case, the First Department granted summary judgment to the commercial landlord against the guarantor and held: “[t]he damages calculation spreadsheet on which plaintiff relies in its motion for summary judgment is a ledger maintained in the ordinary course of business…and plaintiff’s vice president’s affidavit explaining the calculations and the spreadsheet suffices to authenticate the document.”

BLOG / 06.01.17 /Jack Malley

Commercial Division Rejects Landlord’s Application to Vacate Arbitration Award Establishing Fair Market Rent to be Paid by McDonald’s Restaurant

The recent decision by Hon. Shirley Werner Kornreich in Broadway Retail Owner, LLC vs. McDonald’s Corp., No. 651884/2014, 2017 N.Y. Slip. Op. 50011(U), 54 Misc.3d 1206(A) (Supreme Court, New York County, Jan. 9, 2017) concerned a very common provision in commercial leases, which established future rent based upon a percentage of the fair market rent (“FMV”), and provided that if the parties could not agree on the FMV, the issue would be resolved by a binding arbitration. The FMV percentage amount in McDonald’s was 90%.

BLOG / 06.01.17 /Jack Malley

Hon. Sabrina B. Kraus Orders Seller to Return Purchaser’s Down Payment

The recent decision in Gonzalez v. Char & Herzberg, LLP, 2017 WL 1031941 (Bronx County Mar. 13, 2017) concerned a dispute that frequently arises after a deal blows up – whether or not the purchaser has the right to recover her down payment. The purchaser agreed to purchase a single-family home located in Bronx County and delivered a $20,000 down payment to the escrowee. The contract of sale included a mortgage commitment contingency, which conditioned the purchaser’s obligation to close on a lender’s commitment to issue a $495,000 loan for a term of at least 30 years within 45 days.

BLOG / 06.01.17 /Jack Malley

Appellate Division Kills Commercial Lease Guaranty Claim for Failure to Submit Original Agreement at Trial

In 76-82 St. Mark’s, LLC v. Gluck (Supreme Court, Kings County) a commercial tenant sought to recover damages for breach of a guaranty agreement. At trial, the landlord’s counsel attempted to enter into evidence a faxed copy of the agreement that was missing two lines on the second page. The trial judge denied admission of the copy and granted the tenant’s motion to dismiss the case on the ground that the landlord failed to meet its burden of proof.

BLOG / 05.18.17 /Jack Malley

3 Ways a Commercial Litigation Attorney Can Help Your Firm

When it comes to litigation, this area is growing by the day. This specialty of law is really beginning to drive not only revenue at law firms but their legal hiring as well. A survey by Robert Half Legal found that up to thirty percent of the hiring that legal departments and law firms do is in this area, filling crucial positions for commercial litigation.

BLOG / 04.17.17 /Jack Malley

Condos and Co-Ops: Taking on the Secondhand Issue?

When it comes to your housing, is prohibiting smoking in place? Many residential co-op and condo boards are finding that cigarette smoking regulations are a hot button issue. Whether they are able to impose bans on what residents are allowed to do in the privacy of their own home, and whether they should do so or pursue other ways to cut back on secondhand smoke affecting residents is another matter.

BLOG / 03.30.17 /Jack Malley

Civil Litigation Cases 101

When it comes to civil litigation cases, are you up to date? A civil litigation is the result of two or more parties that are involved in a legal dispute and are seeking something other than criminal sanctions, such as money. In these types of cases, they must be tried in a courtroom and a judge or jury will weigh in on the matter and ultimately decide the result. Read on to find out more about these types of cases.

BLOG / 03.20.17 /Jack Malley

The Implications of Trump Administration in Wage and Hour Litigation: What You Need to Know

Michael Mauro will be participating in a live webcast regarding The Implications of Trump Administration in Wage and Hour Litigation on March 27, 2017 from 3 pm – 4 pm.

BLOG / 02.28.17 /Jack Malley

All About Intellectual Property Law

When it comes to Intellectual Property Law, do you know your stuff? This is a law that outlines the rules when it comes to getting and enforcing the legal right to a variety of things such as art, design, inventions, and more. That’s because laws protect personal property, real estate, and also intangible assets and their control.

BLOG / 01.26.17 /Jack Malley

5 Real Estate Laws That Real Estate Owners Need to Know 

When it comes to commercial real estate law, there’s a lot to take in. With so many laws that exist on the books for federal, state, and local laws, it can be pretty confusing. Commercial real estate laws can be so befuddling and complicated that at the end of the day, you really require a lawyer to help you sort through everything. The average person isn’t going to know the ins and outs of the laws on real estate, and when it comes to real estate, when you’ve got money and time invested you really don’t want to get it wrong.

BLOG / 01.05.17 /Jack Malley

Board Business Through a Legal Lens

Watch Ken Jacobs give a lesson on Sexual Harassment featured in the HabitatU course Board Business Through a Legal Lens.

BLOG / 01.04.17 /Jack Malley

Court of Appeals Upholds Contractual Limitation on Co-op Board’s Power to Deny Transfer Applications

In most instances, decisions of a cooperative board are reviewed by courts under the business judgment rule. The business judgment rule provides that a court should defer to a cooperative board’s determination so long as the board acts for the purposes of the cooperative, within the scope of its authority and in good faith.

BLOG / 01.04.17 /Jack Malley

SBJ And Jack Malley Obtain Unanimous First Impression Decision From The Court of Appeals Regarding A Co-op Board’s Duty To Act Reasonably Where The Proprietary Lease So Provides

In most instances, decisions of a cooperative board are reviewed by courts under the business judgment rule. The business judgment rule provides that a court should defer to a cooperative board’s determination so long as the board acts for the purposes of the cooperative, within the scope of its authority and in good faith.

BLOG / 12.15.16 /Jack Malley

What to Do When You Need a Lawyer as an Employer 

Employment law is always changing. Unfortunately, that means that you’re going to have a harder time trying to understand laws on your own. Governments and courts constantly interpret the laws in different ways, so even when you think you have a good grasp of the law there is usually a precedent that has been set that makes everything more difficult. When you start to understand that even a weak case that is made strongly can result in damages awards and potentially bankrupt you, you see why taking legal action and hiring good defensive help is so necessary.

BLOG / 12.12.16 /Jack Malley

The Yellowstone Injunction, a Practical Application

Many commercial landlords and tenants are readily familiar with the term “Yellowstone injunction,” which enjoins a landlord’s termination of the subject lease until a lawsuit commenced by the tenant determines the merits of the alleged default. To obtain a Yellowstone injunction, a tenant must demonstrate that: (1) it holds a lease, (2) the landlord served a notice to cure, (3) the tenant sought the Yellowstone injunction prior to the expiration of the cure period, and (4) the tenant has the ability and desire to cure the alleged default.

BLOG / 12.12.16 /Jack Malley

Commercial Landlord Can Waive “No-Waiver” Clause In Lease

Commercial leases typically contain a “no-waiver” clause that provides, among other things, that no payment by the tenant of less than the full monthly rent shall constitute a waiver of the right of the landlord to collect the full rent amount, and that the receipt by the landlord of rent with knowledge of the tenant’s breach of any covenant within the lease shall not be deemed a waiver of such breach. However, landlords should be aware that the rights that are set forth in such “no-waiver” clauses can be waived. TSS-Seedman’s Inc. v. Elota Realty Company, 72 N.Y.2d 1024, 1027, 531 N.E.2d 646, 648, 534 N.Y.S.2d 925, 927 (1988).

BLOG / 10.13.16 /Jack Malley

Appellate Division Reinforces The Risks Of Filing A Defective Notice Of Pendency

Under CPLR § 6501, a party to an action may file a notice of pendency if the judgment she demands “would affect the title to, or the possession, use or enjoyment of, real property.” The filing of the notice constitutes constructive notice to future purchasers and lenders who are “bound by all proceedings taken in the action after [the] filing to the same extent as a party.” Pursuant to CPLR § 6514(b), a court may grant a motion cancelling a notice of pendency upon the application of an aggrieved defendant who demonstrates that the plaintiff did not commence or prosecute the action in good faith. A court may issue an order awarding a defendant her attorneys’ fees and costs where the court finds that the plaintiff frivolously clouded the defendant’s title or did so in bad faith.

BLOG / 10.06.16 /Jack Malley

Propose a “No Smoking” Amendment

Secondhand smoke has been deemed by the courts to create an automatic nuisance. Many co-op and condo boards have already passed regulations barring smoking within the common areas of the building (such as lobby and hallways). However, boards continue to have a hard time dealing with complaints about smoke escaping from individual units into hallways or infiltrating into other apartments.

BLOG / 10.05.16 /Jack Malley

SBJ And Jack Malley Obtain Impactful Decision In Hot Franchisor Liability Area

In Ocampo, et al v. 455 Hospitality LLC , Doubletree Franchise LLC, et al, SBJ represents approximately 100 plaintiffs who are current or former employees of a Doubletree franchise hotel located in Tarrytown, New York who allege that the franchisee and Doubletree Franchise LLC, the Doubletree franchisor entity, failed to pay plaintiffs minimum wage, overtime pay, gratuities and tips in violation of federal and state law.

BLOG / 10.04.16 /Jack Malley

Do You Need a Social Media Policy?

David Menken Interviewed in Habitat Magazine on a Coop’s Need for a Social Media Policy.

BLOG / 10.03.16 /Jack Malley

Navigating the Transition to Independent Owner Control

Ken Jacobs contributes to Community Association Institute article regarding transitioning condominiums from developer control to independent owner control.

BLOG / 10.01.16 /Jack Malley

David Menken Speaks To Fire Commissioners On Legal Implication of Fire Department Use of Social Media

David Menken spoke to the Westchester County Association of Fire Districts on August 26, 2015 on legal issues involving fire department use of social media.

BLOG / 05.25.16 /Jack Malley

Unveiling The Changes to Federal Overtime Exemption Rules

Michael Mauro will be participating in a live webcast regarding The Changes to Federal Overtime Exemption on May 25, 2016 from 3 pm – 5 pm.

BLOG / 05.12.16 /Jack Malley

David Menken To Present on Cyber Security for Lawyers and Law Firms

David Menken will be participating Thursday, May 12th in a seminar sponsored by the Westchester County Bar Association on “Cyber Security: How Confidential Is Your Confidential Information; Threats, Exposures & Solutions.” Information on the seminar, for which CLE credit will be offered, is at the Bar Association’s web site.

BLOG / 11.06.15 /Jack Malley

Enforce a Smoking Ban

Kenneth Jacobs explains how a condominium associations can enforce a smoking ban in the November 2015 issue of Habitat Magazine.

BLOG / 06.02.15 /Jack Malley

David Menken Presents in Albany on Legal Issues Involving Government Use of Social Media

David Menken gave a presentation on legal issues involving use of social media by local governments in Albany, New York on June 2, 2015 to government officials and information technology specialists at the New York State Office of Information Technology Services Cyber Security Conference His talk centered on two of the most important issues facing local governments which utilize social media: first amendment considerations and compliance with record retention, open meetings and freedom of information laws.

BLOG / 04.13.15 /Jack Malley

Welcome to the Firm!

Smith, Buss & Jacobs, LLP is proud to announce that Michael Mauro, who focuses his practice on labor and employment law, is now Of Counsel to the Firm. Michael has been recognized as a Super Lawyer in the field of Labor and Employment law in recognition of his accomplishments.

BLOG / 03.13.15 /Jack Malley

David Menken Joins the Board of the Hudson River Museum

David Menken has joined the Board of Trustees of the Hudson River Museum, one of the premiere art museums in the New York metropolitan area and Westchester County’s largest museum.

BLOG / 03.13.15 /Jack Malley

David Menken Presents on Data Security Awareness

David Menken, who specializes in information technology, privacy and data security at SBJ, today gave a seminar in data security awareness to the staff of a New York not-for-profit corporation which has access to private information of New York State residents.

BLOG / 02.13.15 /Jack Malley

SBJ Sponsors Habitat’s February Issue

Habitat Magazine’s February Issue features our new Smith, Buss & Jacobs, LLP video.

BLOG / 02.13.15 /Jack Malley

Becoming Proactive about Law Firm Cyber Security By David Menken

“During the early morning hours of June 27, 2014 a hard drive containing backup files for one of the firm’s servers was stolen from the locked trunk of an employee’s vehicle…. We have confirmed that the hard drive may have contained your name, birthday, Social Security number, driver’s license and contact information, such as your home address, email and phone number.”

BLOG / 01.13.15 /Jack Malley

Tarrytown Doubletree workers claim wage abuse

Smith, Buss & Jacobs partner Jack Malley commences $2 million lawsuit against Doubletree Hotel for failure to pay banquet waiters minimum wage, overtime wages, tips and gratuities.

BLOG / 01.13.15 /Jack Malley

Ryan Kaupelis joins SBJ

Ryan P. Kaupelis has joined the firm as an associate in the litigation department. Ryan’s practice focuses on commercial and real estate litigation.